In a way, every Large Minority challenge is a charity challenge. Right from the start, we knew we wanted to be about more than crazy adventures and Sri Lankan chili crab (although the crab is still pretty important). We wanted to be a responsible travel company. That’s why 10% of every trip we sell goes back to local communities and not-for-profit projects in the countries we visit. Places like Cambodia, Colombia, The Philippines and Sri Lanka. But for some of our generous travelers, that’s not enough. They want to give more and raise extra money different projects. They do this through charity events and charity challenge fundraising events, raising hundreds and sometimes thousands of dollars before they’ve even stepped foot in the departure lounge. Anyone can do this, and it’s not as hard as it sounds. Here’s our basic guide:

Event Charity Challenge Fundraising trips:

1. Get social

Start with the basics (the basics that don’t cost you anything): social media. Craft a pitch and distribute it on your social media channels. Encourage your friends to do the same and amplify the message. (It helps to have popular friends in this scenario). Keep the pitch simple and engaging, and make sure there’s a simple call to action at the end: basically something telling people what to do next. Something that makes donating as pain-free as possible. For that you’ll need…

Charity Challenge fundraising

2. Consider crowd-funding

The easiest way to establish your fundraising campaign is to start a Just Giving or Go Fundme campaign online. Anyone can create a project, and it will give you a web page to which you can direct all your potential donors. You can have the flashiest sales pitch in the world, but if there’s nowhere for people to go, it’s really hard to donate. There are literally thousands of current campaigns on these sites, but most crowd funding service have FAQs or project advisors (real life humans, wooh!) who can help you make yours stand out.

3. Tell a story

The best way to get your fundraising voice heard? Tell a story. This is a bit trickier than it sounds. Fundraising for local charities should be a synch, but there is such a thing as charity fatigue. To succeed you need to put a face on your campaign. First of all, tell your story. Who are you and why are you trying to raise this money? What’s the adventure challenge you’ll be tackling? Then, tell the charity’s story. Where will this money go? Who will it help? Try to individualize the project in some way – put a human face on it.

Charity Challenge Fundraising events

4. Use your contacts

Once you’ve set up your crowdfunding page and started your social campaign for your charity challenge fundraising, think hard about using your contacts. Don’t be shy about this. If your parents or colleagues have some powerful friends, reach out to them and see if they’d like to help. If not, you haven’t lost anything, and if so, you’ve just gained a powerful fundraising ally. Any friends or family in PR, Marketing or Media are solid gold, as they could have the skills to either improve your pitch or increase its distribution. Maybe even set up a charity event or two.

5. Set a reasonable goal

World peace is all well and good, but it’s probably quite expensive. You’re not trying to erase the debt of sub-Saharan Africa; you’re trying to help one or two small projects. Setting reasonable targets, with your fundraising goals, charity events, and donation projections, is essential. For starters, people are more likely to give online if they can see they’re getting you closer to your target. Trying to reach 1 gazillion dollars, while admirable, is just going to overwhelm your potential donors. Have a think about how many people you can potentially reach, how many of those will, on average donate, and what the amount of that donation will probably be; do the math to get your final figure.

6. Offer something in return

Obviously we don’t all have the deep pockets to be dishing out free steaks or movie tickets to everyone that chips in a few bucks, but small businesses in your community might. Try door-knocking with local restaurants, movie theatres, cafes, bookshops (anything, really). Explain what you’re trying to do and see if any of them will be willing to help. Essentially, you’re looking for sponsors.

For small businesses, it can be a win/win: they get some free PR from your campaign and get customers through the door. As a charity challenge sponsor companies will be contributing 10% of their fees towards responsible travel projects and be linked with CSR practices. They will also get great branding opportunities through branding on rickshaws, banners, and event collateral. Oh yes, and potential international media coverage. Think about pitching them an experiential marketing campaign, through an adventurous charity challenge fundraising event.

Event Charity Challenge Fundraising

So why should you join a charity challenge? Well quite simply, to make a meaningful difference whilst enjoying the most awesome adventure of your life! Keen to join a charity adventure? Check out some of these fundraising adventure trips.

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